Social Media Categories

 

            Fred Cavazza’s social media categorization gets broken down into four parts, publishing, sharing, networking and discussing. What I like about the approach Cavazza took is that he acknowledged that social media can, and is, utilized to fulfill more specific goals than “connecting.” I think that Cavazza’s idea to break the plethora of social media sites into their specific social goals is useful for organizations to take note of when considering what social tools they use.

            Cavazza’s research into the social media tools most used by brands shows that many of the tools which have attained popularity in the business world fall under the category of “sharing” (ie. Pinterest, YouTube, Instagram). Undoubtedly, the aforementioned platforms are among the heavy-hitters in the social media realm. However, this does not mean that organizations should not be taking the time to disseminate their brands throughout social tools which belong to some of the other categories Cavazza referenced. Perhaps trying to branch out into less popular social medias is too much, too soon for the companies that have just started acknowledging the importance of a social media presence. However, it is important for organizations to understand that in addition to the fact that there are substantial benefits for a brand that affiliates itself with social media, the overhead costs are low. As a result, why wouldn’t a brand want to be more involved in branches of social media such as “discussing” and “networking.” The opportunity to have open conversations in a relaxed environment with those who are directly engaged with your product, helps build consumer relationships. This would provide a contrast to the current “sharing” platforms, which often entail a brand posting social media friendly advertisements,  and leaving little room for conversation.

            This is why, in my opinion, the new generations entering the workforce will make a substantial difference on the consumer-company relationship. The more comfortable an employee is at creating content, and openly engaging with consumers, the more a company will be able to get out of their social media outlets.

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